Category Archives: POCUS

Physician Assistants Pursue POCUS Training



Nicole Reichhart, PA-C, is Assistant Professor and didactic faculty for the California State University, Monterey Bay Master of Science Physician Assistant program. She earned a Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies from Albany Medical College in 2012 and completed an Emergency Medicine fellowship at Eastern Virginia Medical School in 2013. She has piloted a point-of-care ultrasound curriculum throughout the didactic phase of the MSPA program, preparing the students to enter their clinical year with a vast POCUS skillset. Nicole embeds POCUS into both the anatomy and physiology and clinical skills courses. She is passionate about implementing point-of-care ultrasound in physician assistant school curriculum and providing her students with opportunities to collaborate in the shared mission of improving global health and setting standards for excellence in POCUS. She has nine years of clinical experience as a PA, much of which has been in caring for patients in underserved communities. Nicole is a military spouse, mother of three children under 5, and enjoys a good brunch.


Overcoming POCUS Plateaus



Andre Kumar, MD, MEd, is a clinical assistant professor of internal medicine at Stanford University. He is the director for the Stanford Medicine Procedure Service, President of the Society of Hospital Medicine Bay Area, and an instructor for the Society of Hospital Medicine POCUS Certification Program. Dr. Kumar is passionate about researching POCUS for patient care and guiding future accreditation. He is currently the lead investigator for a multi-institutional study involving the use of POCUS for COVID-19, and he recently published two randomized trials investigating how to optimally train resident physicians with POCUS.

Resources

This study found that while a 2-day hands-on ultrasound course provides internal medicine physicians with an initial understanding of POCUS, there are barriers in transferring these abilities to clinical practice.

Find out how an interprofessional, near-peer workshop can help internal medicine residents develop POCUS skills, especially in programs where faculty expertise is limited.

Learn what will help residents overcome the barrier of unfamiliarity with documenting ultrasounds for diagnostic decision-making.

Discover how a phased implementation of POCUS curriculums has proven successful and could inform future educational programs.

Visit us at POCUS.org.


POCUS Augments Critical Care Nursing Diagnostics



Leon Chen, DNP, is a board certified acute care nurse practitioner with background in critical care medicine. He is the clinical program manager of research and simulated learning for the department of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center, and a clinical assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. He is a strong proponent of utilizing point of care ultrasonography to rapidly delineate differential diagnoses and to guide resuscitation. Leon is also a fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and the NY Academy of Medicine. He serves on the editorial board of Critical Care Nursing Quarterly and the Journal of American Association of Nurse Practitioners. He earned a certificate of completion in critical care ultrasonography from the American College of Chest Physicians and is active in point of care ultrasonography education.

 

Resources

Read this study about how nurses’ use of ultrasound enhanced the diagnostic process and level of care heart failure patients receive at an outpatient clinic.

Examine this review of 11 full-text publications and 10 conference abstracts found that patients experience positive benefits when renal nurses and technicians use POCUS. Learn more here.

Discover why the Canadian Association of Radiologists Position Statement on Point-of-Care Ultrasound also relates to nurse practitioners and other health care providers who use POCUS.


Paving the Way for POCUS



Becca Davis, MD, is an Internal Medicine physician at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and an assistant professor at Sidney Kimmel Medical College. She completed her medical school training and internal medicine residency at the University of Pennsylvania where she went on to be chief resident before making the move to Jefferson. She is currently an assistant program director for the Internal Medicine/Primary Care Residency and associate program director for the Internal Medicine POCUS Fellowship, which just started this year at Jefferson. While she was lucky enough to get some exposure to ultrasound in residency, she really developed her POCUS skill set two years ago when she became an attending. She works closely with the EM and critical care teams to help spread her passion for POCUS across the department and participates in the institutional Point of Care Ultrasound Committee. Primarily, Becca is working to create a formalized POCUS curriculum and electives for the residency and develop a clinical pathway for hospitalists to gain POCUS skills in addition to her fellowship and clinical responsibilities.


POCUS and the Environment



Dr. Matthew Burke received his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College and his medical degree from Albany Medical College. He completed his family medicine residency at Brown University and, through the Robert Graham Center in Washington, D.C., subsequently completed a fellowship in primary care health policy at Georgetown University. Since then, Dr. Burke has worked in federal government, academic residency practice, and urgent care. He served as the new physician member to the American Academy of Family Physicians’ (AAFP) board of directors from 2016 to 2017. He is currently practicing in Arlington, VA. He has strong interests in the social determinants of health and in particular environmental determinants, as the climate crisis threatens to be the public health emergency of the 21st century.


The Value of Volunteering



 

James A. DellaValle, MD, is a graduate of the Drexel University School of Medicine. He is a board-certified in emergency and family medicine, focusing on those in rural areas and under-served populations. Dr. DellaValle served as medical advisor and member of the Board of Trustees of Hands Together, a non-governmental organization (NGO) working with the poorest of the poor in Haiti, for 15 years. He has been awarded a fellowship by the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture and the American College of Emergency Physicians. He is also certified by ARDMS in abdominal, cardiac, and vascular ultrasound. Dr. DellaValle continues to be involved in undergraduate and graduate medical education. Presently, he serves as an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at The Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, and as the Chair of the APCA POCUS Certification Assessment Committee.


The Future of Medical Imaging, Today



Donald Rainville, RDMS (ABD & OBGYN), RVT, RDCS and RT(R), began his love for medical ultrasound in 1978 as a SSGT Phase II Radiology Program Instructor with the U.S. Air Force. With 42 years of experience in medical ultrasound imaging, Don now serves as the Vice President of Clinical Innovation at EchoNous. His primary areas of interest are ultrasound education, product design, and artificial intelligence related to medical ultrasound devices.

Babajide Ayinde, Ph.D., specializes in deep learning – a subset of artificial intelligence (AI). He currently works with EchoNous as a Principal Machine Learning Scientist where he develops POCUS-focused AI applications for facilitating clinical workflows. Dr. Ayinde received his Master of Science degree in Engineering Systems and Control from the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia, and his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Louisville, USA. Dr. Ayinde is internationally recognized for his research and expertise in the use of A.I for medical and traditional image analysis. He has authored many peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and has published papers in both regional and international conferences


What Medical Schools Should Consider When Developing A Sustainable POCUS Program



Karthik Vadamalai, MD, received his medical degree at Kilpauk Medical College located in Tamilnadu, India. Driven to practice evidence-based medicine, he pursued his internal medicine residency at Rochester General Hospital, New York, and a critical care medicine fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Dr. Vadamalai also completed a master’s degree in medical education at the University of Pittsburgh. With support from the UPMC internal medicine team and his critical care medicine mentors, Dr. Vadamalai built a sustainable POCUS curriculum for medical residents. Presently, he is a full-time faculty member at Mercy Hospital in Springfield, MO, where he serves as an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Missouri, Springfield Campus.

 


POCUS Enhances Healthcare in Remote Regions



Carrie Hayes, MHS, PA-C, RDMS, RVT, is an Interventional Radiology Physician Assistant for Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto, California and has over fifteen years of experience as a Registered Diagnostic Medical Sonographer and Vascular Technologist.

Additionally, she currently serves as the Clinical director for RAD-AID International, a radiology non-profit organization whose mission is to improve and optimize access to medical imaging and radiology in low resource regions of the world.